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Getting Ready for World Diabetes Day 2021

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Table of Contents

It is essential to look back and recognise the progress we’ve made in managing diabetes. On World Diabetes Day, we celebrate raising awareness about all types of diabetes.

 

Happy World Diabetes Day

 

World Diabetes Day

 

Every 14th of November, we rise to a special day to participate in the worldwide campaign on diabetes mellitus, known as the ‘World Diabetes Day.’ This event was initiated and made possible by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and other organisations such as Diabetes Australia. Throughout the celebration, we direct our focus on education and spreading awareness on this chronic condition.

Promoting awareness starts with opening up topics associated with diabetes and its related treatment and prevention. The difference between types of diabetes is essential to distinguish. While all are chronic diseases that affect how the body regulates glucose, there are differences as well.

 

3 Types of Diabetes

There are three main types of diabetes, namely:

 

  • Type 1 Diabetes or Juvenile Diabetes

It is a chronic condition in which your pancreas is unable to produce enough amount of insulin. Uncontrollable factors often contribute to this type, such as genetics and viruses. It mainly starts during childhood or adolescence, but type 1 diabetes can develop in adults too.

 

  • Type 2 Diabetes or Adult-onset diabetes

This type develops from the infective use of insulin in the body, usually from excess body weight and physical inactivity. The good news is type 2 diabetes is common and easily preventable. 9 in 10 people with adult-onset diabetes could be avoided by following healthy lifestyle changes.

Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to high glucose levels, resulting in several symptoms and potentially life-threatening complications.

 

  • Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes develops during the early months of pregnancy and poses a severe health risk for both mother and child. It needs close monitoring from a doctor or health expert.

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 1.2 million Australians have diabetes. Another 2 million live with prediabetes, which increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It is due to the reduction in insulin sensitivity and elevated blood sugar levels associated with the condition. Research suggests that one in three people with prediabetes will be diagnosed with diabetes in a few years if there are no changes in lifestyle.

It is because of this risk that World Diabetes Day is born. This day is all about bringing awareness to diabetes causes, along with changes you can make to lower the risk of developing diabetes. The most effective way to prevent any diabetes mellitus is to start a healthy lifestyle.

To help you out, we put together a list of simple things you can do towards leading a healthy life.

  • Take control of your plate and eat a balanced meal (focus on eating food that your body needs)
  • Keep a record of your blood sugar levels
  • Get regular checkups
  • Manage your medications
  • Healthy exercise habits (as per doctor’s approval)
  • Fight everyday stress
  • Break the cigarette and alcohol habit
 

Conclusion

Most people with diabetes live a happy and healthy life, which is a big step compared to the last decade. However, there are still setbacks due to a lack of knowledge of this condition and human rights violations. We must put effort towards improving the conditions of people living with it. 

In honour of World Diabetes Day, we suggest that you take time to test your blood sugar levels and reassess the way you live your life. Implement the tips we mentioned above to get in tune with your body and keep it in motion. Learn first aid to know your risks and keep yourself safe from diabetes emergencies.

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